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Libyan Food
Libyan Food contains delicious recipes and fascinating information about Libyan food culture. It discloses no information about its author who describes the blog as being about “food cooked in the modern Libyan kitchen, based on traditional Shargawi [eastern Libyan] and Gharbawi [western Libyan], Amazigi [Amazigh/Berber mountain tribes in western Libya] and South Libyan cuisines” and “recipes recently imported into Libya from the rest of the Arab world.
When the recession hit, you could hear the words buzzing from the cell phones of every restaurant consultant in America: "It's time for comfort food." But under the mashed potatoes and meatloaf lies a question: What does "comfort food" really mean? What about it actually comforts us?  
 
Let's look at some big-time comfort foods: Fried chicken. French fries. Chocolate cake. When people talk about comfort food, the obvious explanation is that it's all about nostalgia and missing Mommy. But that's also cultural. Look at lutefisk, natto and the reddish-black blood sausage I was served once by a sad Belgian who took comfort in what struck me as something you might see in a hospital. And really, it takes more than this to create the rush of sensations that make us feel safe, calm, and cared for. It's a complex interplay of memory, history, and brain chemistry, and while some basics apply — most of us are soothed by the soft, sweet, smooth, salty and unctuous — the specifics are highly personal.
The Science of Pie
What I'm after: The kind of crust that's substantial enough that it doesn't sog-out from a juicy filling but tender enough that it flakes in your mouth into buttery shards. A crust with substance, but not chew. A crust that divides along deep faults into many distinct layers separated by tiny air spaces and that cracks when bent. A crust that is never leathery or pliant, but not so tender or crisp that it crumbles instead of flakes. And of course, it should have a deep butteriness coupled with a balanced sweet and salty flavor.  
 
Easier said that done, right? For many people, making pie crust is a crap shoot. Sometimes it comes out perfectly flaky, other times tough. Sometimes you need just a couple tablespoons of water, sometimes a full 1/2 cup. What gives?  
 
Turns out that the science of pie crust is really not all that complex, and once you get a grasp of what's really going on in between those flaky layers, then making a perfect crust becomes a matter of smarts, not luck.
Breakfast Interrupted
One of our most recent shoots, titled Breakfast Interrupted, is now live for your viewing pleasure. Shot primarily with the Phantom HD Gold at 1000fps, the piece is designed to showcase food in a beautiful and unusual way.  
Forget fast food, processed foods and eating out frequently. Even if you’re on a tight budget, you can still serve healthful, tasty meals.
Tea & Cookies
Tea & Cookies is an award-winning blog written by Tara Austen Weaver. It's about cooking for those you love; traveling near and far; good reads, gardens, growth, & following your passions to see where they lead.
How to cook perfect dal
Not all comfort food transcends cultures. I find it difficult to imagine turning to spam fried rice to mend a broken heart, or stuffed cabbage to banish winter blues (although this recipe does sound pretty damn good), but I fell in love with the soupy, wholesome qualities of dal on our very first meeting.  
 
Unlike many of its British equivalents (mash, hotpot, steamed puddings, even the surprisingly similar pease puddings which preceded the potato in this country), dal is a dish which can comfort all year round: the fresh, sharp spices and clean herbs work as well for me on a cooling summer evening as a dark winter's night. Madhur Jaffrey writes evocatively of the "deep satisfaction" of the dish – "you can take meats and fish and vegetables from an Indian" she says in her Curry Bible, but you cannot take away his dal – "the core of his meal".
Pinch of Yum
Food should be delicious, cooking should be fun, and people should feel good about what they eat. This blog is all about making that happen!  
 
food pr0n at its best
The Gourmand
What elevates the gourmand above your everyday glutton? Both rave about the same three-star Michelin experience, the first because it was rapturous and the second because he wants to make sure you know he had it. Maybe for an old-fashioned stoic there’s no difference, but nowadays things are laxer, and we don’t call the honest gourmet a sinner.  
 
But can you always tell the one from the other? I’m not sure if it’s polite to ask these days, now that cooking is right up there with art and music and literature, but let’s just put it out there anyway.
Harto is a girl who likes to mix alcohol and cooking. Ok, who am I kidding? Harto likes alcohol.  
 
reminds me in an uneasy way about my last relationships ...women and their (ab) use of alcohol - a quite explosive mix
Simple Mint Pea Dip
Green peas are such a delight in their sweet, bright taste, and have a spring-crisp freshness that is welcomed by a winter-weary palette.  
 
Simple Mint Pea Dip is totally tasty and bursting spring-time freshness. The pea, mint and lemon is just such a reliable combo (which you may have noticed by now, as I've posted two recipes already with practically the same ingredients...what can I say? I'm consistent). The tahini is optional, but lends a very lovely creaminess to the spread, which otherwise may not be substantial enough for the hummus fans out there. If you like your dips on the lighter side, leave it out.  
 
This dip is also a chinch to make and is beautifully versatile. Serve it simply like I have on toasted rye bread, or make a complete sandwich by adding avocado, sprouts, and spring lettuce – green!
U.S. cities have vastly different grocery and restaurant budgets - but aren't we all eating the same stuff?  
 
At Bundle, we have a healthy obsession with spending. How much, where, on what — and often, how to do a little less of it. In our short life, we've noticed something: our conversations about money keep circling back to food. Restaurant week specials. Bringing our lunches. Bottled water. Growing our own vegetables.  
 
Our salaries are set. So is our rent. Clothes and other big-ticket items are periodic expenses. But when it comes to food, we get several chances a day to save or splurge. Brian Wansink, the director of the Food and Brand Lab at Cornell University, estimates we make 227 decisions about what to eat every day — each of which has a small financial impact. Go out for drinks after work? Buy the Hershey's chocolate bar or spring for the Lindt? And couldn't we just order takeout? Because after a day's worth of food-and-spending decisions, I'm too exhausted to think about cooking.  
 
Those tiny decisions add up. The average American household spent $3,778 on groceries in 2009, and another $2,736 in restaurants and bars. Buried in those averages are millions of individual purchases that reflect appetites, lifestyles and values. People in Denver devoted 22 percent of their daily spending to food and drink, more than any other city in the country. Residents of Atlanta spent a whopping 57 percent of their food budget on dining out - more than anyone else in the country, and about 28 percent more than the national average.
Sainsbury's is launching a deal that promises it can be done. We asked three leading food writers if it's really possible
Pickled Eggs
Have you ever made pickled eggs? I had never even heard of them until a reader asked for a recipe, and when I mentioned them to my dad, he told me they were bar food. ("Since when do you go to bars, dad?" "Before I met your mother." "So 50 years ago you could get them in bars, in Minnesota." "Yes.") Bar culture aside, two of my favorite foods are pickles and hard boiled eggs, so why not pickle the eggs? Apparently a popular way to pickle them is in beet juice, so that the egg whites turn a pretty fuchsia pink. A few weeks after I made my first batch I was served beet pickled eggs in a salad at a bar/restaurant in Gettysburg. They were pickled all the way through the yolk, turning the yolk slightly pink as well. The longer you keep the eggs in the pickling liquid, the deeper it penetrates into the eggs. I'm guessing to pickle them all the way through you have to keep them in the liquid at least a couple of weeks.
You can slather yourself from your forehead to your pinkie toe in organic lotions, but if you think that alone will make you glow, we have some bad news. From its well documented health benefits to its undeniable impact on physical beauty, good nutrition is the pillar of every kind of healthy lifestyle. That doesn't mean you need to swear off bacon and beer or anything. The trick is finding the right balance.  
 
But with new studies coming out every month about what we should put in our mouths—not to mention the unending discovery of mysterious superfruits from deep in the forests of wherever—it can be hard to keep track of what, exactly, we should be eating. To simplify things, here's a can't-go-wrong shopping list. Bon appétit!