[quote] I visit Prasowy with Polish journalist Pawel Pieniazek, who calls it a "hipster milk bar." The cashier ringing up customers has tattoos and pink-toned hair. The menu is written in multi-colored cursive on a black wall.
(...) Zoja Wygnanska, an 18-year-old high-school student, is eating dinner with two friends. She says she usually goes to "fancy restaurants that serve wine" but comes here when she's craving dumplings. "They cost less than what I usually pay for my coffee," she says.
What Donald Trump wants to get accomplished or initiated in his first 100 days.

CoinTent is a subscription that lets you remove ads across the entire web while still supporting sites you love. CoinTent removes ads on every site you go to, and distributes the money from your subscription to the sites you visit based on the time you spend with them.


Finally! I've been saying this is how ad blockers should work for years.
A fun interactive map of Game of Thrones. Plot characters paths through as they travel through the series/books.
In 1961, the Cuban Missile Crisis was at hand, and with the overhanging fear of an impending Soviet missile strike...families in Central Florida built homemade bomb shelters.

...100 members of 25 wealthy families...pooled their resources and secretly built what is said to be the largest privately-owned bomb shelter in the nation, a massive subterranean structure that is now referred to as the Mount Dora Catacombs.
Liveuamap collects all conflicts-, protests-, terrorism-, weapons-, war-, human rights-, health-, disasters-, weather- related stories from open-data sources, based on region you’re most interested in.
Liveuamap shows geolocated stories on the map with all necessary data that could help you to understand these stories.
A new study of violent behavior in more than 1,000 mammal species found the meerkat is the mammal most likely to be murdered by one of its own kind.

The study...in the journal
Nature, analyzed more than 4 million deaths among 1,024 mammal species and compared them with findings in 600 studies of violence among humans from ancient times until today.

The findings tell us two things:
-- Some amount of violence between humans is attributable to our place on the evolutionary tree.
-- Meerkats are surprisingly murderous.

In the 1960s, the sugar industry funded research that downplayed the risks of sugar and highlighted the hazards of fat, according to a newly published article in JAMA Internal Medicine.
The article draws on internal documents to show that an industry group called the Sugar Research Foundation wanted to "refute" concerns about sugar's role in heart disease. The SRF then sponsored research by Harvard scientists that did just that. The result was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1967, with no disclosure of the sugar industry funding.
Oddimotive
Posted by FoolProof in it's the arts 91 days ago
A blog about unusual vehicles.
I never knew there was a mystery about why there is so much carbon and other key elements on Earth, but one theory posits that a massive planetary collision occurred 4.4 billions years ago that brought large amounts of carbon, sulfur, and other key elements to Earth, thus making life possible a billion years later.
I just heard about this - viruses are a normal component of our gut biome, and may even play a role in killing "bad" bacteria.
Investigative journalist Will Potter is the only reporter who has been inside a Communications Management Unit, or CMU, within a US prison. These units were opened secretly, and radically alter how prisoners are treated — even preventing them from hugging their children. Potter, a TED Fellow, shows us who is imprisoned here, and how the government is trying to keep them hidden. "The message was clear," he says. "Don’t talk about this place."

Filmed August 2015; includes transcript.
I wonder how many of these are on Netflix? I think I've only see maybe a quarter of these.
Otter Source
Posted by potatono in the wired 109 days ago
The source code to Otter, the software that runs linkfilter.
The drugmaker Purdue Pharma launched OxyContin two decades ago with a bold marketing claim: One dose relieves pain for 12 hours...

On the strength of that promise, OxyContin became America’s bestselling painkiller, and Purdue reaped $31 billion in revenue.

But OxyContin’s stunning success masked a fundamental problem: The drug wears off hours early in many people...OxyContin is a chemical cousin of heroin, and when it doesn’t last, patients can experience excruciating symptoms of withdrawal, including an intense craving for the drug.

The problem offers new insight into why so many people have become addicted to OxyContin, one of the most abused pharmaceuticals in U.S. history...

The [Los Angeles] Times investigation, based on thousands of pages of confidential Purdue documents and other records, found that:

-- Purdue has known about the problem for decades...

-- The company has held fast to the claim of 12-hour relief, in part to protect its revenue...


First part of an investigative series.

[vices, the biz]